Most of the information on this AMP site
was researched and written by

  Roger Lee Hall

 

 

Biographical Highlights

 

 

 

Mr. Hall is one of most active American music specialists, working in popular, folk and classical music projects and also for radio, cable television, and video productions. He has the following titles:

 

He has written and compiled over 40 books and music collections and also many CDs and DVDs on various subjects including,

Singing New Englanders, Civil War songs and hymns, Music of Abraham Lincoln's Era, , Composers in America, Old-time radio, Elvis Presley and Cleveland disc jockey Bill Randle, Hollywood film music, and music of the Shakers.

Roger Lee Hall grew up in New Jersey but he had his first music experience singing in a glee club while a young cadet at Eastern Military Academy (E.M.A.), in Long Island, New York, at what was once the magnificent OHEKA Castle of wealthy financier, Otto Hermann Kahn, who was a great supporter of opera and Broadway shows.

After attending E.M.A. for several years, he moved back to New Jersey. He graduated Bloomfield High School in 1960. Since he had already begun writing songs, in the high school yearbook he was listed as a songwriter.

He attended Rutgers University in Newark and graduated in 1970 with a B.A. degree in Music Theory and Composition. He composed his first classical works while at Rutgers. He studied conducting and music history with Dr. Alfred Mann, piano with Chester Fanning Smith, and composition with George Walker and Robert Nagel.

Two years later, in 1972, he was awarded his M.A. degree in Ethnomusicology from Binghamton University. His thesis was on Shaker music notation. He also composed more pieces for piano and voice.

His Ph.D. studies in Musicology took place at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, where his specialty was Shaker music and music from earlier America. He also taught his first class in the History of American Popular Music.

Because he has studied in both the fields of Ethnomusicology and Musicology, Mr. Hall has a broad knowledge of many kinds of music. He is now an authority on vintage American vocal music, especially from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries.

Over the past few years, he has compiled numerous CDs and DVDs focusing on American music subjects, including New England music, music of the Civil War Era, Shaker folk spirituals, vintage popular songs, and film music. Some of the titles are listed in the Multimedia Americana Music Series [MAMS].

His most extensive project to date has been a Deluxe multi-media DVD-ROM with over 200 music examples titled, Preserving Our Musical Past.

In addition, he is an ASCAP composer with over 100 compositions and arrangements to his credit.


Biographical Listings

 

Because of his considerable accomplishments in so many areas of music, he has been listed in two highly esteemed reference volumes for 10 years:

Who's Who in America



Who's Who in the World

Both of these directories are published by Marquis Who's Who®. This is what Editor-in-Chief Fred Marks wrote in his letter to Mr. Hall:

Congratulations! Based on the reference value of your outstanding achievements, Marquis Who's Who has selected your biography for inclusion in the Who's Who in America 2013 (67th Edition). First published in 1899, this renowned biographical reference director chronicles American achievement of the highest merit. It is a testament to your dedication and hard work that you have earned a place once again amongst the country's most accomplished professionals. You should be proud of the achievements that have brought you this prestigious recognition.



 

If you wish to inquire about his compositions or
to commission a piece of music from him,
write to:

PineTree Music



 

 

 

Announcements and Articles

 




Roger Lee Hall is listed on Wikipedia - click here

 

 

Writings about his early years are available at

Memoirs and Music Memories

 

 

 


Composer and Songwriter

 

During military service in the U.S. Army stationed in Germany, he wrote a few songs ("Dream World" and "Frauleins From Frankfurt") and sang them with a trio of Army buddies called, Jake and The Potpourris.

After discharge from the Army he wrote several dozen songs but was unsuccessful in getting them released by record companies.

His third song, "The Soho Serenade," has been released for the first time in 50 years.

In 1968, he turned his attention to studying music in more depth at Rutgers University, taking composition lessons with Robert Nagel and George Walker, the first Afro-American composer to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Music. He also had a consultation session with Aaron Copland.

He has composed special commemorative pieces for various occasions, including "Come, Join In One Accord" for the 75th anniversary of Immanuel Lutheran Church in Attleboro, MA, and "Peace" for the 100th anniversary of Stoughton Town Hall.

Since 1985, Mr. Hall has been a member of ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers) and has composed and arranged over 100 pieces of music including piano works, chamber music, songs and choral music.

One of his compositions, "Creator God, We Give You Thanks" (Op. 25) won a choral competition prize in 1993. Later, he arranged this piece for solo voice and piano and titled it, "Hymn to the Environment" (Op. 35) More information is available at PineTree Music.

Also, he composed a special song in Russian and English available on the CD, Gentle Peace:

"My dareem vam nashee pyesnee"
(We give you a gift of our songs)

It was written for the Sharing A New Song Chorus from Boston to perform on their tour to Moscow, Yaroslavl, and Novgorod in Russia in 1988. His song opened the historic concert when for the first time a combined Russian and American chorus sang together in Yaroslavl. His anti-war song, "Peace" (Op. 14) was given to the directors of Russian choirs when they visited in the U.S.

 

Memoirs and Music Memories -
A Songwriter Remembers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Musicologist and Lecturer

 

Since 1972, Roger Lee Hall has presented many scholarly papers, among them are these organizations:

American Musicological Society (national/regional meetings) Communal Studies Association (national meetings)
Dublin Seminar (New England region)
Maine Statehood Conference
Religious Folk Art Conference in New York City
Shaker Seminars (various locations)

Also, he has been a consultant for such institutions as the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C. and the Paul Revere House in Boston.

Over the past few decades, he has presented over 150 hundred lectures and workshops on a variety of topics, including these titles:

  • Beautiful Dreamer: The Life and Music of Stephen Foster
  • Bing and Bob in Hollywood: A Centennial Tribute
  • Centennial Tribute to Harold Arlen, Dorothy Fields and Jule Styne
  • Charles Tomlinson Griffes: Impressionist Composer
  • Hooray for Hollywood: Memorable Movie Music
  • I Got Rhythm: The Genius of George Gershwin
  • Lincoln and Liberty: Music of the Civil War Era
  • The Lore and Legends of New England Songs
  • Musical Iconography in Shaker Gift Drawings
  • Music of George Washington's Time
  • Remembering Radio: Music and Memories
  • The Sidewalks of New York: Old Songs and Stories
  • The Simple Gifts of Shaker Music
  • Singing Stoughton: The Story of America's Oldest Choral Society
  • Symbols and Symmetry: Shaker Music, Art and Architecture

 

 

He is available to speak about American music preservation in general, or any of the topics listed at

Lectures and Workshops

 

 

Film Music Critic and Historian


holding a Sammy Award certificiate

Since the early 1980s, Roger Lee Hall has been a college and adult education music instructor, a film music historian and critic.

Every year since 1988, he has selected the best film music recordings of each year for his Sammy Film Music Awards.

These awards are named after the Oscar-winning lyricist, Sammy Cahn. The categories include: Best Score, Best Song, Best Overlooked Score, Most Overrated, and occasionally also Worst Song or Score. They are now the longest-running awards chosen exclusively for film music recordings.

He is a member of the International Film Music Critics Association.

Since it began in 1998, he has been the Managing Editor of Film Music Review, and has written over 500 reviews of CDs, DVDs and Books. He has also written articles for print magazines, including Film Score Monthly and Soundtrack.

In addition, he has written an informative reference book, now in its 5th edition, and available on a multi-media DVD with music examples and a video program. It is titled:

A GUIDE TO FILM MUSIC: Songs and Scores

 

If you wish to inquire about consulting work or writing
or a lecture on film music history,
write to him at:

Film Music

 

 

Poet and Playwright

 

Mr. Hall is also a published poet and has written a series of poems about his life and music, including many haiku poems and six of them have been set to music as six haiku songs, Op. 3.

Here is one of his poems, available in the collection, Dream World:

Melody in G


You persuasive radiance!
   Now glistening
                        gleaming
                                     glimmering
Yet never do you
FLASH yourself
Like other
   GAUDY TUNES.


Such brilliant light!
   Singing to me
   like a melody in G -
     With grace
                      gentility
                                  goodness
Ending with a deceptive cadence -

You persuasive radiance!

Copyright, The National Library of Poetry, 1997

 

Two of his one act plays were produced and directed by him and videotaped at their first performances:

"The Grand Constitution"

Celebrating the 200th anniversaries of the U.S. Constitution and The Stoughton Musical Society Constitution, both written in 1787.

This play is in two scenes and concerns the writing of the Stoughton Musical Society's Constitution, the oldest one of any musical organization in the United States.

Music by William Brown, Francis Hopkinson, Alexander Reinagle, William Billings, and Roger Hall.

Videotaped at the Stoughton Public Library, Stoughton, Massachusetts, October 1987.

Read more at:

NOW AND THEN

 

"The Musical Telephone"

This play was based on a chapter from Edward Bellamy's influential utopian novel, Looking Backward (1888).

Music by Edwin Arthur Jones, Joseph Brackett, and Roger Hall.

Videotaped as the opening event at the Bellamy Centennial Conference, Emerson College, Boston, Massachusetts, September 1988.

Read more at:

The Musical Telephone

 

 


 

 

Music Instructor

 

 

 

In 1975, Roger Lee Hall taught his first course on the history of American popular music at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. He was then assisting Bill Randle, a popular disc jockey on Cleveland radio who had introduced Elvis Presley on national television in 1956.

His remembrances of working with Bill Randle are now available in a special multimedia collection titled,

"Shake, Rattle and Roll":
Electric Elvis and Bill Randle

For over twenty-five years, Mr. Hall continued as a music teacher at various colleges and adult education programs. He had a special interest in teaching adult students. He is now retired, though he still presents lectures and workshops.

 

These are a few of the many courses he has taught:

  • Great Composers (J.S. Bach, Handel, Mozart)
  • The Genius of George Gershwin
  • History of American Music
  • Listener's Guide to Music
  • Music in the Movies
  • Masters of the American Song

 

 


Radio Host

Over the years, Mr. Hall has produced numerous radio specials and hosted his own nightly radio program.

During the 1970s, 80s and 90s, he was a frequent guest on Ron Della Chiesa's popular program, MUSIC AMERICA, on WGBH-FM in Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. Hall presented segments on Shaker music, New England music, and his annual Oscar film music tributes, including announcing the Sammy Film Music Awards.

In addition, he produced a monthly radio series titled, "Great American Songs," broadcast on another Boston area radio station. This series paid tribute to many great songwriters, such as: Harold Arlen, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Johnny Mercer, Cole Porter and others.

Mr. Hall also hosted his own nightly four hour radio program on WBET titled, IN THE MOOD, playing Big Band music and popular songs from the 1930s, '40s, and '50s.

Here are a few of his radio specials he presented on his nightly program called IN THE MOOD:

-- Fifties Favorites (Songs and Singers)
--Top Ten Big Band Themes
--Top Ten Movie Songs and Scores
--Tributes to Hoagy Carmichael and Johnny Mercer
--Yanke Doodle Dandy (World War II Musicals)



Some of these programs are listed in his radio guide with accompanying CD:

Remembering Radio: Great Songwriters and Singers

 

 

Cable Television Producer

Mr. Hall produced and hosted a series of music programs on cable television. These programs featured local musicians and historians:

"IN CONCERT" - A series of 12 programs celebrating the bicentennial of the oldest choral society in the USA, The Old Stoughton Musical Society, founded in 1786. Series theme music: "Stoughton Waltz" by Oliver Shaw, performed by pianist, Edward Wood.

"NOW AND THEN" - 4 programs about local history and musicians:

"A CENTENNIAL SALUTE TO STOUGHTON SQUARE"
"A CENTENNIAL TRIBUTE TO E.A. JONES"
"OLD STOUGHTON AND THE GRAND CONSTITUTION"
"A STOUGHTON MUSICFEST"

Singer

 

 

 

 

 

 

For over three decades, Roger Lee Hall has been a singer in numerous programs at museums, historical sites, libraries, churches, colleges and universities, conferences, and special events.

He is one of the performers on this CD:

Gentle Words

 


 

 

Music Preservationist

Besides his many other achievements, Mr. Hall has spent considerable time working to preserve neglected American music from the past.

His preservation work includes researching, editing, publishing,
performing and recording the music.

Mr. Hall's most extensive project so far is a collection of books and music collections with over 200 music examples, and the multimedia DVD is titled,

 

Preserving Our Musical Past

 

A great deal of Mr. Hall's research has been involved with music from two of the oldest singing traditions in the USA:

 

Music in Stoughton


He has received several Massachusetts Arts Council grants for this project which involved researching and writing about music and composers in Stoughton during the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. See this article: Saving Local Music

This town has the oldest surviving choral society in the United States, founded on November 7, 1786. Originally called The Stoughton Musical Society, it also has the oldest constitution of any performing musical organization, written in 1787 just a few weeks after the United States Constitution.

He has compiled and edited music by local composers, such as: Alanson Belcher and Edwin Arthur Jones, Stoughton's most accomplished past composer.

He produced a number of publications and CDs featuring Stoughton music, including these titles:

 

 

Music of the Shakers

The second major project involved collecting research about this religious communal society, the oldest surviving one in the United States.

The Shakers originated in the Manchester area in the UK. Their spiritual leader, Mother Ann Lee, and eight of her followers arrived in New York City on August 6, 1774. This is the date celebrated by the Shakers as the beginning of their church in America.

Their first settlement was at Niskayuna (later Watervliet) New York in 1776, and their first community was established in 1787
at New Lebanon, New York.

Roger Lee Hall is one of the foremost experts on Shaker music and has written extensively about it for 40 years.

He was the first student to write a Master's Thesis dealing with Shaker music. His thesis with music analysis is titled:


The Shaker Letteral System:
A Practical Approach to Music Notation

(Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, 1972)

 

Since then he has researched and uncovered hundreds of Shaker spirituals, performed them in concerts, and recorded many of them as well. He has also edited and arranged over 200 Shaker tunes and written about Shaker music in numerous publications.

The best known Shaker song is "Simple Gifts" (aka: 'Tis the gift to be simple). He has studied its origin and evolution and written a history of the song.

In addition, he has compiled and edited these music collections:

  • A Western Shaker Music Sampler (1976)
  • The Happy Journey: Thirty-five Shaker Spirituals (1982)
  • Love is Little: A Sampling of Shaker Spirituals (1992)
  • A Guide to Shaker Music (1996, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2006)
  • Come Life, Shaker Life: The Life & Music of Elder Issachar Bates (2004)
  • How Happy Are They: Twelve Shaker Spirituals (2007)
  • Gentle Words: Shaker Music in the 20th Century (2009)
  • The Story of 'Simple Gifts' (2006, 2009, 2010)
  • May We Ever Be United: Music of the North Union, Ohio Shakers (2012)
  • A Shaker Music Miscellany (2012)

He has worked on these recordings as singer, consultant, or editor:

  • Harp of Joy -- Soloists and Plymouth Church Choir
  • Love is Little -- Soloists and The Sampler Chorus (Sampler Records)
  • Joy of Angels -- Soloists and The Sampler Chorus (Sampler Records)
  • Simple Gifts -- Boston Camerata and Sabbathday Lake Shakers (Erato)
  • Let Zion Move -- Shakers from Canterbury & Sabbathday Lake
    (Rounder Records)
  • The River of Love -- Soloists and Chorus of New England Voices
    (Albany Records)
  • Verdant Groves -- Music from Four New England Shaker Villages
  • Blended Together -- Interviews with The Shakers (AMRC)
  • Gentle Words -- A Shaker Music Sampler (AMRC)
  • Celestial Praises -- A Celebration of Shaker Spirituals (AMRC)

Two of these Shaker recordings are described here:

Let Zion Move:
Music of the Shakers


2 CD set featuring commentary and 40 Shaker spirituals performed by the Shakers from Canterbury, New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. The recordings and interviews were made between 1960 and 1980. Also included is a 72 page illustrated booklet with all the words for the music and extensive notes by Roger Hall. This is the most extensive historical recording ever compiled of the Shakers speaking about their heritage and performing their music. Much of it was recorded by Bill Randle, the Cleveland disc jockey who helped promote Elvis Presley in the 1950s.

To order a copy of this CD set, click on this link:

Let Zion Move: Music of the Shakers

 

 

Love is Little:
A Sampling of Shaker Spirituals

CD released from Sampler Records containing 36 Shaker spirituals from all the major Shaker communities in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Hampshire, Maine, Ohio and Kentucky. A songbook with all the music and extensive notes, including a music chronology, is also available.

Click on this link for more information:

Love is Little: A Sampling of Shaker Spirituals

 

 

 

Publications



A list of multimedia computer discs,
music collections, and recordings
compiled and edited by Roger Lee Hall:



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